The Assyrian texts accounts the Universal Flood long before the Bible

The Assyrian account of the Universal Flood appears on a tablet, dated about 1,500 years before the Genesis of the Bible.

The Great Flood was first described by scribes from Babylon and Assyria. 
It appears among 12 tablets from ancient Assyria; drawn up in the year 2100 BC.

The Assyrian account of the Universal Flood appears on a tablet, dated about 1,500 years before the Genesis of the Bible.

The Great Flood was first described by scribes from Babylon and Assyria. 
It appears among 12 tablets from ancient Assyria; drawn up in the year 2100 BC.

The work presents many similarities with the story of Genesis: building an ark, Utnapishtim (one Noé Assyrian-Babylonian ), the sending of a bird to locate mainland, and slaughter of animals for the Gods.

12 tablets with the Assyrian-Babylonian story of the Universal Flood

They are the 12 tablets of the epic of Gilgamesh discovered by the archaeologist Hormuzd Rassam in 1853.
They were in Sumeria (modern-day Iraq) inside the palace of the king of Assurbanipal of Assyria, whose reign was between 668 and 627 BC.

The Assyrian texts accounts the Universal Flood long before the Bible
Tablet 11, “Tablet of the Deluge”, from the Epic of Gilgamesh, 7th century BC.

George Smith was the one who discovered the oldest account of the Universal Flood in 1872.
Smith translated it from the Akkadian language into English. 
He narrated its translation to the Society for Biblical Archeology in London, for the first time.
It had been re-read in more than 2,000 years.
The response was shocking, generating debates about the Bible, whether the Epic gave it truth or not.
The Universal Flood appears on Tablet XI and is narrated by Utnapishtim to Gilgamesh. 
Utnapishtim is the Akkadian-Assyrian Noah who built an ark to save humanity. 
He told him that the God Ea (Sumerian Enki) was the one who announced to him that a great flood planned by the Anunnaki was coming:

When their hearts prompted the great gods to raise the flood. There was Anu, his father, the brave Enlil, his adviser, Ninurta, his assistant, Ennuge, his irrigator. Ea, the Cunning Prince, was under oath with them. So he repeated his talk to the reed house: ‘O man of Shuruppak, son of Ubartutu: tear down the house and build a ship! Give up wealth and look for living beings! Spurn possessions and keep living things alive! Get all living things on the boat.

Tablet 11 of the Epic of Gilgamesh.

The Assyrian account tells that the universal flood lasted for 6 days and 6 nights

The Assyrian texts accounts the Universal Flood long before the Bible

Ea told him to build an ark, which was built by carpenters and workers. 
Utnapishtim saved his relatives, workers, and many animals. 
On the day of the flood, a large black cloud was seen in the sky. 
The Gods Shullar and Hanish generated a massive storm and torrents of water flooded the Earth. 
It lasted for 6 days and 6 nights. 
Interestingly, on the seventh-day humans had turned to clay.
Utnapishtim then anchored the ark on Mount Nimush (also called Mount Nisir). 
He released a dove and a swallow, but they returned without finding solid ground. 
Then he sent a raven who did find her. 
Utnapishtim sacrificed a sheep and burned incense, reed, cedar, and myrtle as an offering for the Anunnaki.
The Gods arrive where the offering was presented.
Ea explained to him that the flood was cruel against humanity and thus calming the conflict. 
Ea transferred immortality to Utnapishtim and his wife.
She blessed them to become Gods.

This Assyrian account of the Universal Flood is very similar to the Genesis one. 
There the God Yahweh tells Noah to build an ark and after the flood, the ark is anchored on Mount Ararat. 
A lot like Noah, Utnapishtim also, released a dove to find dry land and then slaughters animals. 
Both the Annunaki and Yahweh are attracted to the smell of sacrifices.
Could it be possible that Yahweh was Anunnaki?

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