The Guy Hottel Memorandum Of FBI Describes Crashed Flying Saucers in New Mexico With Occupants

The document presented here was written by a special agent under the name of Guy Hottel, who sent a memorandum to then-FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. 
The Guy Hottel memorandum describes information from an Air Force investigator, listing three “flying saucers” recovered in New Mexico along with their alien occupants.

The Guy Hottel Memorandum Of FBI Describes Crashed Flying Saucers In New Mexico With Occupants

According to the informant (whose identity remains unknown to date), the ships suffered damage because the government had “a set of high-power radars in the area” that interfered with their systems.

The Guy Hottel Memorandum Preview And Download

The Guy Hottel Memorandum Of FBI Describes Crashed Flying Saucers In New Mexico With Occupants

To view or download in PDF format, follow this link .

Additional Information by FBI

The following was published by the FBI in March 2013 to explain the memorandum. And although they present some additional facts, they recognize it as an unsolved “mystery.”

—- BEGINNING OF THE FBI EXPLANATION -—

It is the most popular file in the FBI Vault , our electronic reading room that houses various bureau records released under the Free Information Act (FOIA). In the last two years, this file has been viewed almost a million times. Even though it is a single page about an unconfirmed report that the FBI never followed up on.

The file in question is a memo dated March 22, 1950. Its author is Guy Hottel, formerly head of our field office in Washington, DC Like all memos back then, it was addressed to Director J. Edgar Hoover, and registered and indexed in FBI files.

The matter was anything but ordinary. It was related to a story told to one of our agents by a third party, an Air Force investigator who reported three “flying saucers” recovered in the New Mexico desert.

The memo provides the following details:

Date: March 22, 1950 
To: FBI Director 
From: Guy Hottel, SAC, Washington 
Subject: Information regarding Flying Saucers

The following information was supplied to SA [crossed out].

An Air Force investigator stated that three of those known as flying saucers have been recovered in New Mexico. Their description indicates that they have a circular shape with an elevation in their center, and an approximate size of 15 meters in diameter. Each of the objects was occupied by three humanoid bodies barely 1 meter tall, clad in a fine-textured metallic material. The bodies were bandaged in a manner similar to that used in the suits of test pilots facing high speeds.

According to Mr. [crossed out] informant, the saucers were found in New Mexico due to the fact that the government has a high-powered radar setup there that is believed to have interfered with the flying saucers’ navigation mechanism.

The information mentioned above was not subsequently evaluated by SA [crossed out].

After offering the cause for which the saucers were found, the memo simply ends by saying that the information “was not subsequently evaluated,” referring to what was communicated by the FBI agent.

That would have been the end of this particular story, just another dead end in our archives. But when we launched the Vault online in 2011 , some outlets noticed this memo and wrongly reported that the FBI had published evidence about the UFO crash in Roswell, New Mexico, and the recovery of the remains. This news went viral and the Vault was overflowing with visitors.

But what is the real story? A few facts to keep in mind:

First of all, the Hottel memo is not new. It was first released to the public in the late 1970s and has been available on our website for several years prior to the launch of the Vault.

Second, the Hottel memo is dated almost three years after the infamous July 1947 events in Roswell. The FBI file on Roswell (also a popular page) is posted elsewhere in the Vault .

Third, as noted in a previous story, the FBI has very occasionally been involved in investigating UFO and alien reports. 
For a few years after the Roswell incident, Director Hoover ordered his agents – at the request of the Air Force – to verify any type of sighting. 

But that practice ended in July 1950, four months after the Hottel memo, suggesting that our Washington Field Office did not consider the stories about flying saucers worth their attention.

Finally, the Hottel memo does not prove the existence of UFOs; it is only a second or third hand statement that we never investigate. 
Some people believe that the memo repeats a hoax that was circulating at the time, but the bureau has no information to verify such a theory.

Sorry, this is not any definitive test on UFOs. The mystery continues.

—- END OF FBI EXPLANATION -—

Short biography of Guy Hottel

Guy L. Hottel was born in 1902. He was a graduate student at George Washington University, DC, where he was known to be a star (American) football player. He was later inducted into the college’s athletic hall of fame. He became a special agent for the FBI in 1934. In December 1936, he was appointed acting chief of the FBI Field Office in Washington; He was appointed space agent in charge in May of that year and served until March 1941.

Hottel was reinstated as special agent in charge in February 1943 and served until 1951, when he took a position in the Identification Division. He retired in 1955. Hottel was married three times and had two children.

After his career with the FBI, he served as executive secretary for the Horseman’s Benevolent Association. He died in June 1990.

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