Viking arrowhead is found after the melting of a glacier in Norway

Climate change has revealed the lost Viking arrowhead launched by some Viking about 1500 years ago.

Viking arrowhead

The finding dates from the Germanic iron age and took place at a height of 2,050 meters on the edge of a glacier located in Jotunheimen, a mountainous area in southern Norway whose etymology means ‘The home of the Giants‘.

The viking arrowhead, made of iron, is 17 cm long and weighs just 28 grams. It was accompanied by a broken wooden shaft and a pen. The archaeologists who found it noticed that climate change has been taking its toll on glaciers in the area, which are gradually warming and gradually releasing ancient artifacts like this one from their icy prison.

“Three national parks converge in this region of Norway, but Jotunheimen is by far the most spectacular, with 250 peaks over 1,900 meters high, including two of the highest in northern Europe – (Galdhøpiggen and Glittertind),” says the anthropologist Shoshi Parks, who is part of the Glacier Archeology Program . «Among these stone titans are alpine lakes and gleaming turquoise glaciers; it is an ancient landscape of indescribable beauty ».

Lars Pilø, who is also part of the same program, adds that the rapid melting of the latter is revealing “small pieces of human history, in inverse order of time.”

And although this means that researchers can recover relics from the past, it is also a threat to the objects themselves if they are not discovered in time.

The team has been digging at Jotunheimen for several seasons now, and last year found an ancient snow-shoeing horseshoe, which they estimate dates back to the Viking or medieval era. “And since it was frozen, its state of preservation is amazing,” they announced with a tweet back then.

The  Oppland-based Glacier Archeology Program has so far recovered more than 2,000 artifacts from the glacier area, the oldest being about 6,000 years.

The relics include man-made items such as hunting tools, textiles, leather, clothing, as well as zoological materials such as horns, bones, and manure.

Source: Glacier Hub

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